Watch: New Loch Ness Monster Documentary

Posted on Feb 28 2016 - 8:39pm by Cryptozoology News

New Hampshire resident Aleksandar Petakov has just released a short documentary on the Loch Ness monster.

The 11-minute film walks the viewer through different theories as Petakov interviews Loch Ness Monster hunter Steve Feltham.

We sat with the 22-year-old filmmaker to find out more about his work.

“My name is Aleksandar Petakov, I live near Boston. I graduated from Quinnipiac University in May of 2015 with a BA in Film, Video & Interactive Media and minors in History and Political Science,” he explains. “I have worked on numerous films ranging from student, independent and documentary films over the years. Currently I am doing freelance video work in the Boston area after traveling for a few months in the fall.”

Petakov, who considers filmmaking “a job and a hobby”, believes the possibility of a dinosaur-like creature living in the infamous lake is highly unlikely and that alternative theories should be looked into.

“I’ve been interesting in lake monsters, Bigfoot and the unknown ever since I was a young boy. The philosophy of legendary agent Mulder is ‘I want to believe’.  I would say I share some of that sentiment. While it’s incredibly fascinating to ponder that a dinosaur could still exist in Loch Ness, I think it is simply wishful thinking and highly unlikely,” he says.

“Steve Feltham has his recent Wels Catfish theory, which I think seems quite plausible. I will say however I do find it very interesting that lake monster sightings occur around the world, often in lakes in the northern hemisphere, like Loch Ness, Lake Champlain in the US and Okanagan in Canada, that were once connected to the ocean, or resulted from glaciers. I think science offers some solutions to many of the sightings, but ultimately it is human hubris to claim we know everything about these mysteries bodies of water. We know so little about the ocean, so there have to be unknown species, perhaps even a few large ones.”

lake monster loch ness monster nessie

The documentary maker shares similar thoughts about Bigfoot and likes to keep an open yet skeptical mind.

“From what I understand, the human family tree is constantly expanding with new discoveries, like the Flores ‘Hobbit’. What children today learn is different than what children a few decades ago learned about our ancestors, as our knowledge of them is expanding,” he meticulously articulates. “I have spent a fair amount of time in the wilderness of the Northeast United States and been to places like the Great Smoky Mountains and Alaska, witnessing first hand how wild some of these areas still are. Is it possible that near human ancestors still may live in remote wilderness areas in the US, Canada and Russia, where most of these ‘Bigfoot’ sightings occur? Possibly. Or could Bigfoot, like lake monsters, simply be a human desire for mystery and intrigue? Also possible. I’m not entirely sure, so I like to investigate things myself.”

And that’s what his next project will be about, he explains, as he tells us about his plans to travel to northern California this spring. He will thoroughly investigate the Bigfoot phenomenon by visiting historical locations and interviewing numerous eyewitnesses. His intentions are to turn the gathered data into another documentary.

But cryptids and the paranormal are not the only topics Petakov likes to dive in. He is currently working on a film featuring his recent travels to secretive North Korea.

“Having been to one of the most isolated countries on earth I truly feel fortunate to have at least some insight into this mysterious land. With that I would like to share those experiences and help fill in some blanks about this country, especially in such a time of volatility between North Korea and much of the world,” he says.

To check out Petakov’s work and for updates and information regarding his future projects, visit his website PetakovMedia.

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2 Comments so far. Feel free to join this conversation.

  1. Mista Marsupial February 29, 2016 at 5:30 am - Reply

    Och aye ,Jim laddie … or maybe Loch aye ?

  2. iphonerepair March 27, 2016 at 4:34 am - Reply

    The term “monster” was reportedly applied for the first time to the creature on 2 May 1933 by Alex Campbell, the water bailiff for Loch Ness and a part-time journalist, in a report in

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